Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review :: Microfly Interior

06-22-2006 · Category: Hardware - Cases

By Tulatin

In order to get everything to fit properly in a product of this size, some careful and intelligent engineering has to take place. To make things simple, I'll be splitting the architecture of this chassis up into two sections - upper and lower, who will be separated by the support bars which run across the case. To start, the upper portion of the case has quite a bit of potential, but also quite a bit of wasted space. On the left side of the prevailing optical drive cage, a cage to hold two hard drives vertically sits. In a similarly shaped spot on the other side of the case, nothing but a gap sits. It's assumed that this area is intended to pass wiring through, but I would have still loved to see another hard drive cage here, though it would have taken away the only place to hide wires. Spinning the case around, there is a mount for your standard sized (or slightly larger, if you don't mind a modification, and have short optical drives) PSU, flanked by the previous 120mm fan mount on the other side. On the topic of the previously mentioned support bars, there are two which run across the case, and keep the drive cage steady, as well as a single bar which goes across to ensure that the power supply stays balanced. Unfortunately, it seems like the central rail in my case sustained some damage, as its rivets run loose, and it sits down a little lower than desired. On the plus side, though, the cage was made from a thick enough pane of aluminum that it remained rigid though my titanic hands were busy inside the case.


Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review
Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review
Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review
Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review
Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review

Swinging down below the bars, things seem to be an entirely different world of open space at the moment. When removed, the motherboard tray's securing tabs can easily be seen, amongst the rat's nest of cabling which dominates this portion of the case. With the motherboard tray slid in, however, you can see that there'll be about 3" free at the front end of the case, for use with whatever perpetual you'd like to toss in up there, or perhaps even the bulk of the goodies behind a watercooling solution, or a short cold cathode - the choice is yours, and apart from the 80mm fan mount found here, the world is wide open. Onto the motherboard tray itself, it's a single piece affair, with a sizeable gap in its back for easy access to the motherboard. As to the back panel, each slot is blocked off with a removable divider, and capped at the top with a series of vents. Woe will be to users with tall heatsinks, though, as even the RX-K8 silent boost proved to be about 20MM too tall to fit into the case. So, I just ended up putting on another 92mm fan (which would run at 5V), and JUST making the tray fit, watching a thin layer of plastic scrape off the fan's top as it slid in. My advice to users of taller sinks? Install it while the tray is slid in. On the plus side, the cables from the front panel are long enough to be installed on the motherboard while its tray is outside of the case, so even users with my sort of hands can fit the board in. Just make sure to push it in the right way when you're re-installing it, though, as it will not fit if incorrectly installed. On a side note, ALL things inside this case will unfortunately require tools, but once it is all installed, it feels solid, sturdy and secure, even when jerking that forward handle. With the internal architecture put down, let's get on to taking a look at the included power supply.


Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review
Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review
Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review
Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review
Ultra Products: Microfly SFF Case Review