Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup :: Thermaltake Mini Typhoon

05-18-2006 · Category: Hardware - Cooling

By Tulatin

Thanks to the rather significant reduction in size in terms of width and depth, our cooler comes to us today packaged vertically in Thermaltake's typical triangular packaging. Thanks to this, the entirety of the unit - the RX open frame fan, copper fins, and sizeable bottom block - will all be visible to the consumer right from the get go. Across the package, advertisements are made about the capabilities and merits of this cooler. As per specified by the packaging, the Mini Typhoon is rated to handle up to 130W of heat, while generating only 18 dBA of noise.


Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup

The specs continue on the back of the package, with notes made toward the fact that apart from the size, the size and density of the fins remains the same, while the material changes to copper. Each 92x45mm block of 0.2mm waved copper fins is fed by three heat pipes, much in the same manner as the Big Typhoon was. The only concern here is that while the heatsink may weigh in at a hefty 605G, it may not have the surface area necessary to hold temperatures down when thermal loads reach near unreasonable points. Bolted into the corner of each heat dispersing block, the copper painted aluminum shroud comes with fan holes for just 92mm fans, meaning if you'd like to put on a more powerful fan, you'll either have to grab an adaptor, or use another 92mm fan. I bring this to light due to the fact that while the RX fan does operate at reasonable noise levels, and does manage to push nearly 40 CFM of air (38.7), the amount of air which is capable of being bounced off the surface of the fins is heightened. While you will not hear the rebounding air thanks to the design of the RX fan - one which was first debuted into the consumer channels by Intel on their reference coolers, you will lose a fair amount of air, as precious CFM that should have gone through the fins now escapes out next to the blades.


Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup

Following each of the thick heat pipes to the base of the cooler, I found a slightly revised base which is incompatible with previous Thermaltake mounting hardware, and justly so - after you use the bundled mounting method a few times, I know you'll never want to go back. As to the quality of the fit and finish of the base, the top where the clips will go is relatively smooth and shiny, while the base is visibly impacted by machining marks, running horizontally along its length. These marks shouldn't be much of a worry though, as with no noise heard and no vibration felt while running a finger nail across the base, I have full confidence in the ability of the bundled thermal grease to do its job, and fill these voids. Packed with the cooler in the black box below, is as always, the mounting equipment and manual for this unit. While I have had some bad experiences with mounting Thermaltake coolers (see Silent Tower), I have few qualms with the new straight clip, and Z bracket designs. While some users may feel un-nerved by the relative simplicity of the mounting platform, and the ease through which the manual describes the process, there is no need to worry - things work as well as they should, usually.


Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup

The only issue comes from the fact that the included Z bracket, while a tremendous improvement over the traditional bolt bracket, introduces one major roadblock - the heatsink will be at a 45 degree angle to the mounting holes. With this as a problem, I would be completely unable to mount this heatsink on my Thermal Testing motherboard (a Gigabyte 8I955X Royal), due to the heat pipes either butting against the Northbridge, the power circuitry module, or the upper bundle of fins doing the same. As such, it's important to check the surrounding area on your motherboard before purchasing this cooler, to assure that you can actually mount it. The second issue to follow is the fact that even when securely clamped down, this heatsink wiggles a whole hell of a lot on the Athlon 64 platform. Indeed, along with the fact that there is no sure way of centering the heatsink, resulting in differences between installations of up to 10 degrees centigrade. This could have been easily avoided by including a base like the one found on Gigabyte's 3D Rocker Cooler pro, where copper protrusions ensure that the cooler is centered perfectly each time. This, coupled with the fact that the cooler wiggles so easily, bring forth the possibility of moving the heatsink around once it's installed, definitely not a good sign. The final issue here is that while Thermaltake has long focused on cross compatibility, there is now no official way to get this heatsink installed on Sockets 423, 478, 603/604, or 462, which will leave owners of Northwood and prior Pentium 4s, Xeons, and Athlon XPs out in the cold. While it may be possible to find the requisite adapters to mount the cooler on these boards, the operation will be heinously difficult, and considering how often capacitors ended up too close to the CPU socket in those days, largely unadvisable. For what it's worth, though, the Mini Typhoon is usually free of issues, and provided your motherboard supports it, a viable choice - that is, if it can perform up to snuff. With that being said, let's take a look at its bigger brother, before the showdown across two platforms takes place.


Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup
Thermaltake Typhoon Heatsink Roundup