Ultra ULT31664 1GB PC3200 Memory Review :: Ultra ULT31664

05-14-2006 · Category: Hardware - Memory

By Tulatin

Coming to us in a pair of typical Ultra packets, these two sticks suffered no damage during their trip, as the simple but effective dimple system held them in place, while the fluffy foam peanuts all around them protected the units from shock. On the front panel of this packaging, information is included about the modules, and the claims of unparalleled compatibility, full technical support, and simple installation are made. Now, while no instructions are actually found within the package, we'd hope the end user can at least fathom the simplicity of socketting memory, if they're going to be doing the upgrade. Around the back of the package, behind the modules themselves are the conditions of the warrantee - a rather simple set that essentially sets out that all things short of physical damage will be covered if you do need to RMA.


Ultra ULT31664 1GB PC3200 Memory Review
Ultra ULT31664 1GB PC3200 Memory Review

When the packaging was popped open, and the modules revealed, we noticed two things straight from the start. First and foremost, the large holographic stickers will make sure that your modules are genuine, and secondly, the Liberty chips featured on these sticks are vastly unknown to us - as well as that know it all, Google. Even going to our contact inside Ultra yielded little information, as he was forced to tunnel deeper to help find out this information. We finally found out that these are custom fabricated ICs, made by PDP to help Ultra hit the low price point that these sticks appear at. For what it's worth, these sticks are rated for a somewhat abysmal 3-4-4-8, though we had no issues running them at 3-3-3-8 throughout the course of testing, as well as our wee foray into overclocking. These chips will be bare when they come to you too, tied down to a well thought out Brainpower PCB.


Ultra ULT31664 1GB PC3200 Memory Review
Ultra ULT31664 1GB PC3200 Memory Review

Therein lays a problem - in past, usually nameless chips would result in poor overclocks, if they even ran at stock speeds. While we found ourselves easily able to steer clear of the second problem, you'll see just how short these sticks come up on the first later in the review. It's with that in mind, that our American readers will end up with heavy hearts buying these sticks - after all, at $160, there are many other options out there. For us Canadians, though, there is a nice, thick silver lining. First off, in order to get a $99 stick of memory here, we'll have to put up with cheap trash chips such as Elixir, or even worse. Secondly, the best warrantee we'd get with them is a 30 day "promise of replacement" from the shady folks at the local shop. Wonderful. At least in that respect, buyers on both sides of the border can be assured that they won't have to jump through hoops to try and get their hard earned product back, and that in the end, they'll be greeted with high performance every time they fire up their now stable rigs. With our dreams of sky high clocks streaking across the sky in flames, let's at least see how well these modules perform under our standard test conditions.