Corsair Flash Voyager Vs OCZ Rally Review :: The Corsair Flash Voyager

02-06-2006 · Category: Hardware -

By Tulatin

Packed up tightly in one of those hermetically sealed, slice and dice containers we love to hate, Corsair's Flash Voyager is as hard to get out of the casing as it is durable. Featuring a thick rubber rounded coating surrounding the key itself, you know that this key has to be durable. Even from the first moments of handling it and plugging it in, the durability and quality of the unit creates a certain reverence in us - we know that the 10 year warrantee Corsair offers on these drives will probably leave us unused. At the cap of this rubber casing, Corsair's logo is embossed and inked in white - ink that stayed put even after days of general use and abuse stayed vibrant. Further down the key, along it's body, the name of the product - Flash Voyager is embossed into the key on one side, while Corsair's web site is imprinted on the back. Near the drive's lanyard clip (which is used to remove the key more often then not) is a small blue Status LED, with the drive's capacity stamped onto it. The drive's LED remains off until the moment of truth, when it begins blinking like a madman to indicate that your data is indeed being transferred.


Corsair Flash Voyager Vs OCZ Rally Review
Corsair Flash Voyager Vs OCZ Rally Review
Corsair Flash Voyager Vs OCZ Rally Review

Included with this drive in the packaging is a thin lanyard with a clip at the end. To be honest, this lanyard wasn't particularly to our liking - the thin, ribbon edges were at first uncomfortable, not to mention the bright blue and white of the strap just didn't look quite right with anything we wore. Still, after a period of time, the embarrassment of the strap wore off with its incessant chafing, and considering the light weight of the key, we all but forgot it was there. Also included in the packaging is a quality USB extension cable, who's rubberized ends and stylish clear sleeved silver cabling look and work amazingly with the drive, no matter where it is placed. To those of you wondering why such simple things garner such high praises, it has something to do with the fact that my last USB key lost all markings along it's exterior in the first day, then proceeded to fall apart slowly. Anyone even handling the Corsair Flash Voyager, or those watching my torture of the poor device can assure you that that kind of thing will probably never happen with this key. Perhaps the only issue to such a strong casing is in it's thickness - if you plug this drive into a rear mounted USB port, you're not plugging anything in above or below it. With Corsair's flaws and merits in plain view, let's move on to seeing what OCZ can bring to the table.


Corsair Flash Voyager Vs OCZ Rally Review