Kingston KHX6000 PC2-6000 Memory Review :: Packaging, Aesthetics, Specifications

10-18-2005 · Category: Hardware - Memory

By Tulatin

Kingston's KHX6000 modules come packed within their signature retail blister pack, which takes the liberty of holding the modules snugly with formed inserts as well as a clear plastic cover. This cover in turn is held by a sticker which surrounds the packaging, brandishing a UPC as well as the module's model number. After you slit the sticker open and free the modules, you'll come across a brief instruction manual, detailing the installation verbally and with a single image. While it's not much, the fact that it's not really too difficult to install memory must be considered.


Kingston KHX6000 PC2-6000 Memory Review
Kingston KHX6000 PC2-6000 Memory Review

Packaging aside, it's time to take a look at the modules themselves. Each of the two modules features a common green PCB adorned by Kingston's signature blue HyperX Heatspreader. Compared to the HyperX modules of yore, there are a few notable changes. First of all, on the far left of the module (assuming we are on the side opposite the rating sticker) there is a stylized DDR2 logo following what seems to be the tribal idea, and on the far right, the traditional Kingston Logo has been slid down and topped with their logo. While these are minor changes, the bringing of more reds onto the heatspreader really help to bring out contrast and boost the attractiveness of the module. Flipping the modules around, we're again greeted by an enlarged version of the stylized DDR2 logo, a massive version of the Kingston Technologies insignia and logo at the Centre of the module, and a rating sticker at the far right of the module. This sticker gives us two out of the three necessary pieces of information model number and rated voltage, while leaving out the all important timings, leaving users to figure them out on their own, usually via the World Wide Web.


Kingston KHX6000 PC2-6000 Memory Review
Kingston KHX6000 PC2-6000 Memory Review

Seeing as how we're a part of this massive collective medium known as the Web, it's only fitting that we're going to list the module's specifications here. These modules are rated to hold down timings of 4-4-4-12 at PC2-6000 (DDR2-750) timings with a paltry 1.9V. Now, considering that these modules have actually been on the market for a fair deal of time, leaving the latencies to be somewhat less impressive then they would have been at the debut of this line. While these modules are rated to do these speeds, we found that, unfortunately we were unable to crest the 750MHz mark with any combination of voltages and latencies (usage of the 4X Multiplier as well as the -2X Multiplier caused a booting failure, as well as trying 240*3.33), thus showing that these modules are, unfortunately, unable to perform at PC2-6400 speeds. While this may seem somewhat inadequate by today's standards, bear in mind that with the age of these sticks, the speeds they are rated to run at (and run at with ease to boot) would have been impressive for their time.