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Voltage increase?

 
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kuojo
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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 6:25 pm    Post subject: Voltage increase? Reply with quote

Ok so I have been doing research on overclocking. On of the things that catches my attention is the voltage increase. I don't understand why you would increase the voltage to make the computer stable. If the FSB is set and the processor is stable than why increase the voltage for stablity? Also when do you increase to voltage? Can you guys just give me some examples or somthing?

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fussnfeathers
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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Depends on what voltage you're talking about, and what your motherboard allows you to do.

There's two voltage setting in all motherboards, CPU Vcore and memory voltage. When you overclock, the ideal scenario to have is to be able to clock the RAM back a bit (say, if you're running DDR400, manually clock it back to 333), then increase your FSB. The more you increase the FSB, the more power the processor is trying to draw. You'll have to increase the Vcore to compensate. That depends a lot on the processor itself, some can happily overclock a good ways without a Vcore bump, others can't get much of anywhere at all.

Memory is much the same. The faster you push it, the more you have to increase the power going to the RAM. Gaming type (marketing term for high end RAM) can accept higher voltages, Value type RAM can't, the chips can't take the power increase.

For your question, though, if you've increased the FSB, and both processor and RAM are speeding along happily with no crashes, BSoD's, or errors, leave the voltage be. You only need to touch those settings (if they're even available in your BIOS) if you start crashing with your overclock, but want to try and keep it.

In either case, Vcore or memory controller, you don't need to make big jumps. The smallest increment you can, stress test, only go within a small range. Too much may get you stable, but you'll roast the CPU quite quickly, it's not built to hande the higher voltages. You'll see some logs, where the Vcore was raised to stablize an OC, but it was only raised .05v.
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kuojo
Pilgrim
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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 7:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok so let me get this strait: if you overclock you processor to a higher speed and it begins to crash you can increase the voltage of the Vcore to compensate to try and keep those settings right?
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fussnfeathers
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PostPosted: Tue May 18, 2010 8:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Right. You shouldn't have to increase much, one small step-up should do it. If you're finding yourself increasing three steps, you'll have to back your OC off, it won't go that high. Some procs can, some procs can't, even within the same model and stepping. If you look hard, you'll see that hardcore overclockers will look for months for a particular batch number of processor. Each processor comes off a large chunk of silicon, designed for a particular speed. The cores that don't make that grade get dropped down until they can meet quality standards, then marketed at that speed. One particular batch, though, might show that more high speed chips were on it than Intel realized, so those particular chips (say, the previous P4 2.4 Northwood) can actually run perfectly fine at much higher speeds, like 3.2ghz, without any deep-level tweaking, and even faster if you do mess with voltages. ES (engineering sample) procs, like I have, are even more elusive, since those aren't supposed to get out of Intel's hands. Those are completely unlocked, so I can not only mess with the FSB and voltages, I can also flip the multiplier around, among other things.
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