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 Post subject: Re: Trivia time!
PostPosted: Wed Feb 10, 2016 4:43 pm 
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Mobo-fu Master
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What is a "banjo fitting"? Checking to see if one feels right in your hands?
Might be a good idea!

A "banjo fitting" is often found on brake, fuel and oil lines on vehicles. A 'donut' shape, with a hollow center and mated to the end of a hose or metal tube on one edge. Soft copper washers seal each side to the device hub and fastening bolt. The bolt would be hollow for fluid flow.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banjo_fitting

What size was the first floppy disk used with computers?

The first floppy disk size was 8 inches, and held about 80 KB of data. First used by IBM in 1971.
Prior to that, data or info was stored on "punch cards". The disk could hold up to an equal of 3,000 "punch cards" in data!
http://www-03.ibm.com/ibm/history/ibm10 ... kthroughs/

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 Post subject: Re: Trivia time!
PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2016 3:25 pm 
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Today, April 04, 2016, was a 'square root' day. The square root of 16 is 4.. or 4x4=16.
The last 'square root' day was March 3rd, 2009. The next occurrence will be May 5th, 2025.
http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/obs ... erwhelmed/
Can you believe that April 02 of this year was "peanut butter and jelly" day?
We also almost had a "Pi day" this year. (03.14)

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 Post subject: Re: Trivia time!
PostPosted: Fri Apr 29, 2016 5:45 am 
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We always see the 'checkered flag' used at the finish of a race. Who was the person that made and first used same?

First use was the 1906 Vanderbilt Cup race on Long Island, NYC.
Designed by Sidney Waldon, who worked for the Packard Motor Company.
Originally intended for notifying drivers of 'checkpoints' along the race course.
But in 1980, the trend became that twin checkered flags were waved at the end of the race.
Today, only one checkered flag is waved at the end of a race.
Checkpoints are now marked with pole flags of different colors or mile post markers.
A 'co-pilot' or 'associate' riding with the driver keeps tab on the course for speed, time, and markers.
The driver only drives, with timed cues from the 'co-pilot'.

CATV is a common feature in many homes. Who developed the idea, and when/where?

Leroy "Ed" Parsons is regarded as the 'father' of CATV. In the late 1940s, he noted a TV station in Seattle, WA. was going on air. His home town of Astoria, Oregon, was too distant to get a good signal. So he designed and built an RF amplifier, mounted with a high-gain antenna on the roof of a nearby hotel, and piped the boosted signal to his home.
In only a few months, neighbors wanted to be on his system to get TV signals!
A monument was erected in 1968 on nearby Coxcomb Hill to commemorate the first 'community' CATV system in the U.S.
The TV station? KRSC-TV, Seattle, WA. Mr. Parsons was an experienced electronics engineer.
TV signals do not travel more than about 60 miles before becoming greatly attenuated (lose strength). And must be line-of-sight.

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 Post subject: Re: Trivia time!
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2016 5:21 am 
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When did the term "grunt" first be used, as to military slang?
That term was coined during the 1960s Vietnam War, when some soldiers had to carry a large amount of field equipment with them into battle.. average weight was 100 lbs!

Ever heard of or seen a "Marius Mule"?
A "Marius Mule" was the term given to Roman Legionnaires around 100 BC times, carrying shields, lances, other armor into battle. General Gaius Marius had ordered this.

Today's infantry does not fare much better as to "lightening the load". With GPS, night-vision, portable computers, body armor and such, plus personal needs, still near that 100 lbs. of back breaking weight.
Development is ongoing to create a mechanical mule that can autonomously follow one or more soldiers into battle, and carry up to 500 lbs. of equipment. Only problem is the propulsion means. Battery is quiet, but depletes quickly. Engines are noisy.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvrjgkocS40

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 Post subject: Re: Trivia time!
PostPosted: Thu Dec 22, 2016 3:46 pm 
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Most of us have heard of a "hope" chest, a "war" chest.. or an "ice" chest. Somewhat self-explanatory.
But does anyone know what a "steam" chest is?

A "steam chest" is the part on top of a locomotive steam cylinder that drives the wheels. Inside is a sliding valve that directs pressurized steam into the cylinder and also exhausts spent steam.
http://www.animatedengines.com/locomotive.html

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 Post subject: Re: Trivia time!
PostPosted: Sat Oct 14, 2017 6:52 am 
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"Dropping the ball".
Can apply to a lot of events, but where did the original meaning come from?
This is an old rail road term, where the train signal went red, meaning stop the train NOW. Rail road signals have the 'go' or green lamp at the top, the 'stop' or red lamp at the bottom. "Dropping the ball" meant that a light bulb or lantern inside the signal dropped from 'go' to 'stop'. Another type of signal used on rail roads was the semaphore, or movable arm. In the vertical position, that was a 'go' signal. When down to the horizontal position, 'stop'.
Hand lanterns were also used to signal the engineer, using an up-down motion to proceed.. side-to-side for stop. The speed used to move the lantern did note whether to go slow, or faster.

"High balling" is another old rail road term, where the signals show clear for a long distance.. and the train could go faster.

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 Post subject: Re: Trivia time!
PostPosted: Tue Jun 12, 2018 9:05 am 
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Talking with a friend the other day, he noted getting a 'rescue' mixed breed for the family. Nice choice.
Then I asked him if he knew of a "bench dog" or "lathe dog". Nope. When I explained what they were, he gave me that 'one-eyed' look! :wink:
A "bench dog" is a type of clamp used to hold material on machine stands, such as a drill press or lathe. Or on a woodworker's bench, to hold material securely. A "lathe dog" is a type of accessory clamp to secure material in the rotating head of a lathe.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bench_dog
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lathe_dog

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