"up to 54 mb/s"

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"up to 54 mb/s"

Postby bdub » Thu Mar 06, 2014 10:16 am

so if a wireless router says it does "up to 54 mb/s", does this typically mean it has that number as total bandwidth to all wireless devices attached to it (so if say, 5 devices were attached to the router wirelessly and transferring stuff as fast as they could, then each device has ~10 mb/s for use), or does it mean it can do 54 mb/s to EACH and every device?
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Postby Roach412 » Thu Mar 06, 2014 11:50 am

effectively expect for each user/connection you should divide the total available speed across each.

i.e. you have 1 user, they (in theory) get the full pipe. 2 gives 54/2, 5 gives about 10 each.

this makes massive assumptions that each user is consuming the same amount of bandwidth...constantly... which is practically impossible unless they're cloned machines to do the exact same things over the wireless, and would basically just be a synthetic proof of concept.

if you think of it as wifi/data transmission is a flow of water, if you have 5 hoses hooked up to the stream flowing through as each hose opens the total amount of water flowing remains at a max of 54. it now diverts between 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 smaller hoses siphoning. it'll be completely dynamic as each client will draw more or less bandwidth. each "hose" modifies in size as their draw increases to a certain extent, so it's not very static. it's a pretty flexible example scenario unfortunately.

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Postby bdub » Thu Mar 06, 2014 12:11 pm

gotcha, thanks.... the 54 mb/s is what the router can give at any one time through wireless, which is what I was guessing and my boss was not, so you backed me up.
I understand the concept differences between theoretical figures and actual real world outcomes.
I was trying to locate somewhere that would tell me this on the web, but had no luck at it.
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Postby Roach412 » Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:11 pm

mostly can't find that because it's exceedingly hard to prove...so, what i'm saying is based entirely off of theoretical time-use sensitive assumptions.

in a typical use(i.e. internet related utilization) then it really wouldn't matter anyways unless you have a really high connection speed. standard cable/dsl is not going to keep up with your wireless speeds.

if you do a lot of streaming from within your own network, then you might run into problems, but "typical" home use won't generally degrade your max wifi speeds for more than a few seconds.

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Postby bdub » Fri Mar 07, 2014 6:35 am

ok, so some background. this is for a client who I installed a new tv for along with a bdplayer that has wireless capability. we set up Netflix to run in the bdplayer connecting to the fios router he's got. everything works fine (tv is very near the router, so great signal), but being a group house, now everyone else in the house wants to do the same thing. I think he's got 3 or 4 other rommmates (he rents out spaces in his house). I'm not sure what tier he's on with the fios, maybe 15 down 5 up. anyhow, dude is a complete... (how can I say "moron" without using that word?), um, he's not very smart with electronics of any sort. So I'm trying to explain to him the basics, and this was a "basic" I wasn't sure of.

my sister usually handles this guy's needs (setting up his broadband, fixing his minor computer problems, which to him could be things like his email won't work or the resolution on his monitor changed), but I came in for this one as I am good at TV's/sound systems and the like.
he was happy as a clam at first with Netflix going straight to his new lcd without a wire, but now all the roommates complain they don't get much service wirelessly to their rooms. I don't know if they always had that problem and just started complaining about it... or if it is they just can't stream Netflix throughout the house at the same time, or what.

dude even signed up for fios tv thinking it would help solve the problem, which was a stupid idea (I guess he was thinking everyone could stream fios tv straight to their rooms or something).

...and zero cable running around the house... neither coax or cat5/5e/6 going to the rooms.
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Postby Karlsweldt » Fri Mar 07, 2014 8:50 am

As Roach412 explained it basically, that is the rule. The more 'usage' you place on a fixed flow of data or other energy, the less each user or "portal" can obtain. The primary or initiating source maintains a constant flow, up to the maximum limit noted. Hard-wired Intranet is basically faster than 'wireless' Intranet, due to a lesser externally influenced bandwidth. Wireless protocol includes accepting any interference from like devices in the same broadcast frequency range. Cell phones, remote controls and WiFi devices share the same frequency bands.. plus microwave ovens and satellite TV!
There are several frequency ranges.. in the 800 MHz and 2.4 GHz (UHF band) which are most popular. But other frequency bands are also reserved for specific wireless use. Radio Frequencies:
The world-wide radio signals for real-time coordination utilize a much lower frequency band.
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Postby Roach412 » Fri Mar 07, 2014 8:57 am

There's tons of factors that come into play with signals. in theory having his TV really close to the router could contribute to signal issues. generally speaking, you want other electronics away from our wireless source. you also want as few heavy density things between the source and any consumer of the wireless. this can include (seriously) things as simple as fridges, cinder block walls, metal/solid core doors. these all will have (typically minor) impacts to signals. also, the more electronics you have in the mix, the more transmission noise is incurred. if a neighbor(close-by) recently added wifi, and happens to be using the same or very similar wireless channel, it will conflict and interfere with your signals as well...

these are just some of the super common things that mess with wifi... also the orientation of any external antennas can impact signal(so if it was great, and you moved the router to be oriented in a new direct and now it's bad...re-orient it and see if that improves).

there's 1 or 2 spots in my house where signal drops dramatically, but if i step 2 feet in any direction i'm back to excellent coverage. it's a game of trial and error with this stuff normally.

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Postby bdub » Fri Mar 07, 2014 9:27 am

Roach412 wrote:having his TV really close to the router could contribute to signal issues


when I say close... it's still 15 or 20 feet away. straight line, no walls, practically looking at the router. unlike the bedrooms in the house... up stairs, lots of walls, no line of sight.
my sis has talked about putting some type of access point somewhere to strengthen signal upstairs and to the basement... I've explained all this to the guy in emails, but it's like talking to a (VERY) small child when comes to electronics.
and I try not to sound like this guy...
http://youtu.be/tfKL6RM8hsY
but, to him, I prolly do.
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seagate 1TB HDD 64M cache sata3
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Postby Karlsweldt » Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:04 am

What type of wireless setup is this? RF type or IR type? With IR type, it is line-of-sight only. But due to a very narrow bandwidth, usually only one device is connected. With RF type setups, there should be no problem with connectivity through walls unless they have metallic content. Going above or below the radiation plane of the antenna can cause high signal loss. But there are "repeaters" that can be part of the system, so there is better coverage in a vertical mode. There also are "range extenders" that can cover up to 1/2 mile or more. But check for legality issues before using.
Yet both system types can suffer from an echo effect.. signal "bounce" as it is known, from reflective surfaces. This can cause data packet errors which incur resend requests.
RF signals go only in a straight line, but can be influenced by strong magnetic fields. IR signals also are line of sight, but can be influenced by heavy moisture in the air.. causing scatter and weak reception.
Indeed, if a neighbor has similar equipment to yours, the signals may conflict with each other.. and you have a "hand-off" effect similar to FM radio, where you are nearer a stronger station and you loose "your" tunes.
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Postby evasive » Sun Mar 09, 2014 4:54 am

anything wireless including mouse/keyboard, game controllers, mobile phones, microwave ovens generally operate in the 2.4GHz spectrum band. Being electromagnetic waves, these bounce off walls, can be blocked by whatever metal parts/sheeting inside the house and will decay over distance pretty quickly. I have been fighting a battle inside a clients house trying to cover a distance of only 5 meters with 2 walls in between using a wireless repeater, a wireless router with DDWRT and finally decided to use a simple wired switch connected to the router through powerline network adapters. There's simply too many of his neighbours using el cheapo wireless routers that are out-of-spec using waay to much wattage to transmit...

So, my solution: go wired using existing power cabling and powerline network adapters. Will save you hairs....
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