Antique PC BIOS Update

Moderator: The Mod Squad

Antique PC BIOS Update

Postby mooresmsr » Sat Apr 13, 2013 8:54 am

I have a PC I built in 2003. It has an ASUS P4S8X motherboard. I want to build a new PC, but wouldn't you know it, my video card bit the dust about 2 weeks ago (fan gave out). I bought a new video card from visiontek, to go in my AGP slot, and it fit fine. However, the drivers don't work. I talked to Visiontek support, and they want me to update the BIOS on my mb (never updated since I installed it in 2003). I got some help from ASUS, but evidently they made their BIOS update tons easier just after this board came out. The manual for the board goes through updating the BIOS, loading stuff on a floppy. Part of the process is creating a bootable floppy with MS DOS on it. I am running Windows 7, which doesn't have an option for creating such a disk/CD/etc. I did a quick google search, and there are some places on the net where I can download a non-MS DOS set of software that I can load on a disk/CD/etc. to do the deed. Questions --

1. Will this work? I don't know about non-MS DOS stuff, and feel squishy about updating BIOS without the "right" OS support.

2. When I download stuff from website x, I can copy it to device whatever, but what will put the boot information on the final device, since Windows 7 doesn't support making such a disk/CD? Is there a trick to getting this low-level execution information stuck on the disk? I seem to remember something about formatting with a /S or something like that in the far distant past.

3. The instructions from ASUS (for the just-after-I-bought-this-mb process) says to put the update and the update program on a flash drive. Should I put this stuff on the boot device, instead? Maybe this is an ASUS question.

Hope you can help me. My goal is just to make the video card run at better than VGA level, so I can continue my build-a-new-PC process. The problem with VGA mode is that chunks of my research are in video presentations (MB reviews, how to install stuff, etc), and the board in VGA mode doesn't work fast enough to make the video display without skips.

SMM
mooresmsr
Initiate
Initiate
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 5:05 am
Location: Iowa

Postby Toby B. » Sat Apr 13, 2013 8:05 pm

Not sure if its still availble but you could make a boot floppy that will allow you to gain access to a DOS interface outside of windows..

www.bootdisk.com

Something that ancient I am assuming it has a floppy drive.
Toby B.
Lead Mobo-fu Master
Lead Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 14277
Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Maine

Postby Karlsweldt » Sun Apr 14, 2013 8:49 am

A floppy disk for use in BIOS updates must be in FAT-12 format, the default for BASIC mode. The older MS-DOS system does this by default, but it still can be done if using the 'command' prompt mode with Win XP or later. You have to manually enter the arguments for formatting.
http://www.microsoft.com/resources/docu ... x?mfr=true

AGP cards are becoming scarce, but can be found on eBay for reasonable prices. If your card is still functional but the fan isn't, then replace the fan. New Egg and other sources sell GPU fans that should be an exact replacement or very close. If the GPU or chips have been fried, no hope.
F@H.. to solve mankind's maladies.. in our lifetimes!
Karlsweldt
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 20662
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 11:57 am
Location: 07438

Thanks for info

Postby mooresmsr » Sun Apr 14, 2013 9:50 am

Toby, I went to the boot site and it has just what I need. Now I have to re-enable my 1.44 drive, find a floppy, test it out to see if it still works, and do the deed. I have the BIOS update and flash utility from ASUS, hope the A: drive works (I turned it off and took it out of the config years ago).

Karls, I thought about the fan route, but I think the chip is fried. I took the old fan off, and it is truly DOA. If nothing helps, I'll steal the fan from the new board and see if it works on the old board. Question about assembly -- when I took the fan off the old board, I had to take the heat sink off the board itself, and the heat sink had a thermal paste connection with the GPU on the board. The connection via the thermal paste is obviously gone. Do I scrape/remove the old paste (and how do I do it), and do I follow general pasting guidelines for reattaching the heat sink on the old board?

SMM
mooresmsr
Initiate
Initiate
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 5:05 am
Location: Iowa

Got the update done

Postby mooresmsr » Sun Apr 14, 2013 12:49 pm

I used the site that Toby pointed me to and downloaded a zip self-extracting boot disk creator, loaded the bios update and flash program on it, booted from the antique floppy drive, got the bios updated, everything is great with the box, as far as I can tell. However the video board still runs only in VGA mode, so I'm back to talking to the people at visiontek.
mooresmsr
Initiate
Initiate
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 5:05 am
Location: Iowa

Postby evasive » Sun Apr 14, 2013 10:59 pm

What model is the Visiontek card?
What make/model power supply are you using?

What driver set are you trying to use? When was the last time you updated the chipset drivers?
We hate rut, but we fear change.
********************************
System error, strike any user to continue...
evasive
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 37389
Joined: Sun May 06, 2001 12:01 am
Location: Netherlands

Postby Karlsweldt » Mon Apr 15, 2013 5:06 am

As to chipsets and heat sinks, esp. the CPU and GPU:
Those items generate a lot of waste heat.. and it has to be dissipated efficiently, or the chipset will quickly become a "crispy critter".
Those small DC fans rely on a servo-motor type drive, no brushes.. so as to have a totally silent RFI profile. But they cannot tolerate any friction, and after a year or so, the fan may fail due to dried lube. There are exact replacement fans available, and not hard to replace.
As to the connection between the heat sink and chip surface.. you need a medium of special heat-transfer material, typically silicon paste, that fills in the minute pores of the surfaces and effects a higher rate of transfer. A minimal amount is recommended.
The old material should be totally removed, but avoid sharp scrapers. A hard plastic scraper, like an old credit card, would be good. Soften the old material with denatured alcohol.. nothing stronger. And wipe any old material off the surfaces.
F@H.. to solve mankind's maladies.. in our lifetimes!
Karlsweldt
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 20662
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 11:57 am
Location: 07438

More about the video card

Postby mooresmsr » Tue Apr 16, 2013 1:17 pm

Karls, Thanks for the info about the thermal paste and proper application. As I said before, the last time I bought a mb, the fans and heatsinks were all installed for both CPU and GPU, so I have zero experience with actual heatsink installation.

evasive,

AGP card from visiontek is 3450 AGP 512M DDR2 B2

The driver install cd that came with it also installed some crossfire stuff, as well as putting the Ask toolbar on my browser, but it did install what I think is the correct driver. Because it didn't work, I went to the visiontek site, downloaded the file for the driver from there, executed it, and got the same result (after I had gotten rid of the driver and software from the cd install). I deleted everything again, used the properties box from device manager and pointed it at the visiontek download for the driver install. Didn't get the crossfire or the Ask toolbar this time, and did get the driver successfully installed, according to the messages. Rebooted, same status -- driver produced "no good" message, properties shows the correct driver installed, but the device is running in VGA mode. When I talked with visiontek, they wanted me to update my BIOS, which I did, and nothing changed. I need to talk to them, but this board and technology is old enough that it probably is before any of the kids that answer the phone for them know or understand. At any rate, I can only call before 4:30, and my work schedule means that can't happen till Thursday. Any ideas before then? Am I possibly getting a 64-bit driver with my 32-bit (Pentium 4) machine?

SMM
mooresmsr
Initiate
Initiate
 
Posts: 69
Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2002 5:05 am
Location: Iowa

Postby evasive » Wed Apr 17, 2013 12:52 am

If I check the picture that shows up for this card I notice it has a seperate power connector. You MUST connect that connector, otherwise it's not going to function fully, drivers, bios or whatnot.
We hate rut, but we fear change.
********************************
System error, strike any user to continue...
evasive
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 37389
Joined: Sun May 06, 2001 12:01 am
Location: Netherlands

Postby Karlsweldt » Wed Apr 17, 2013 7:49 am

evasive wrote:If I check the picture that shows up for this card I notice it has a separate power connector. You MUST connect that connector, otherwise it's not going to function fully, drivers, bios or whatnot.


Evasive has a good point!!! If there is a power connector on the inner edge of the video card, it must be mated to a power lead set from the PSU. Typically, the same type as for optical or hard drives.. but may also be a semi-special small 4-pin or 6-pin type. The card slot cannot provide full power for higher-end cards.. so you don't get the optimum performance.
F@H.. to solve mankind's maladies.. in our lifetimes!
Karlsweldt
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 20662
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 11:57 am
Location: 07438

Next

Return to BIOS

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: YandexBot [Bot] and 1 guest