Gateway/IntelD865GLC or BF86510A.15A.0043.P07

Moderator: The Mod Squad

Postby Toby B. » Thu Aug 04, 2011 11:14 am

15A is the manufacturer code for Gateway. 86A is true Intel.
Toby B.
Lead Mobo-fu Master
Lead Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 14277
Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Maine

Postby leheremite » Fri Aug 05, 2011 4:21 pm

Thanks!
Do you know what the P07 means ?

MK
leheremite
Pilgrim
Pilgrim
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:56 am

Postby evasive » Sat Aug 06, 2011 12:03 am

P07 is the release number, just like P13 and P21. Given the reaction of your board I would not flash it at all but first check the physical condition. Mostly when you have power troubles (not proper reset,sleep/hibernate/shutdown) you have bad capacitors in there somewhere, either on the board or in the power supply.

http://www.badcaps.net has info on this. Please check and verify first.
We hate rut, but we fear change.
********************************
System error, strike any user to continue...
evasive
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 37389
Joined: Sun May 06, 2001 12:01 am
Location: Netherlands

Postby leheremite » Sat Aug 06, 2011 5:59 am

I would agree if Windows XP pro has not working properly before but this problem came by upgrading to windows7 .
Any explanation ?
MK
leheremite
Pilgrim
Pilgrim
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:56 am

Postby Karlsweldt » Sat Aug 06, 2011 6:42 am

If the mobo were made specifically to Gateway specs, then it is not honored by the parent manufacturer. But there likely are identical models in the Intel line.. with differences in BIOS configurations or physical components.
Interactive support for this D865GLC Intel version is ended. And from checking the compatibility chart for use with Windows 7, looks like a no-go.
Here is the Intel page link for OS compatibility with mobo models.
This Intel page has links for proper BIOS update procedure, as well as other useful links.
But if the mobo was produced exclusively for Gateway or another OEM brand, the BIOS and driver versions are likely different.. and may or may not work.
One problem may be that the ACPI feature is not compatible.
F@H.. to solve mankind's maladies.. in our lifetimes!
Karlsweldt
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 20659
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 11:57 am
Location: 07438

Postby leheremite » Sat Aug 06, 2011 4:36 pm

I tried few times to chat with Gateway customer support, unsuccessful.
I was connected somewhere in India, they advise me to use their pay services.
Which of course I did not have any intention to use especially after their
professional BIOS recommendation ( wrong for another mobo)
I do not know if the power supply do have any driver.
It muss be something stopping the system to shutdown completely.
But what ?

MK
leheremite
Pilgrim
Pilgrim
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:56 am

Postby Karlsweldt » Sun Aug 07, 2011 5:34 am

A power supply does not need a driver! But the power supply must have stable voltages and current.. or the motherboard will be very erratic in operation, and may shut down. One cause of premature shut-down would be the CPU overheating.. due to inefficient heat transfer to the heat sink. Or if the OS has detected a violation of its privacy/restricted file access, or corrupted files. And in the OS contract, there is the EULA which mandates that "one OS, one install, one system" be adhered to. If the OS from one setup is used in another system with major differences, then the OS will shut down and become useless.
Time to do a voltage check at the main power plug on the mobo. All voltages must be within +/-2% or less. The -12 volt lead can be off by up to 2 volts, but still within limits. A higher wattage PSU than required will have better regulation than one that is marginal!
Here is a diagram of the main ATX 24-pin power plug for standard motherboard designs. The 20-pin plug is identical, except for the bottom four connections. If there is no -5 volt lead, don't worry. If the mobo needs that source, it is created from the -12 volt source by an on-board regulator.

Image
F@H.. to solve mankind's maladies.. in our lifetimes!
Karlsweldt
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 20659
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 11:57 am
Location: 07438

Successful bios update.

Postby leheremite » Fri Aug 12, 2011 6:30 am

well after many try, if found in the gateway support site a interesting note.
How updating the bios with windows. IN short term they suggest to use following string: run C:\CABS\9527776\BF86510A_P13.EXE -a mb.
I tried and it worked. I have no idea what the -a mb does.
However now the bios don't recognize my hard drive(2).
In the drive menu I see the sata and pata option, but my I can not activated my pata.
Has this problem anything to do with the jumper on the drive " master and slave" ?

MK
leheremite
Pilgrim
Pilgrim
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:56 am

Postby Karlsweldt » Sat Aug 13, 2011 6:47 am

It is important that, after a BIOS update or flash, you reset the BIOS to default. Sometimes, the only sure way is to pull the PSU power plug, attempt a few starts to drain reserves, then remove the battery and use the provided 'clear' jumper setting for about 10 seconds. Then reverse the process, power up and go immediately into the BIOS and set the pages according to the system build.

PATA or IDE drives require a 'master' or 'slave' setting, being parallel on the same data ribbon. With the older 40-wire ribbon, placement of the slave/master in relation to the connector was not critical. But with the 80-wire data ribbon, the placement and jumper configuration can only be set as designed. The lone end connector is for the mobo header, the farthest connector for 'master' and the next nearest connector as 'slave'. There is no master/salve configuration for SATA drives.. but it is preferred that you use the SATA 1 port for the drive with the OS installed. There is an option in certain BIOS programs to allow choice of which drive to first seek a boot path. If not using a RAID configuration, set the BIOS option as "JBOD" or "AUTO". With a RAID configuration, you need two or more drives of equal capacity to set the option.
On first powering up, look in the bottom left of the first screen for a BIOS string. That is a positive ID of your system. Should be a date marker, then the version/model of the BIOS. If you can't decipher it, post that so a pro can explain it and note specifically what you have. If the BIOS date is more than 5 years old, then it may not be able to work with large capacity hard drives. Partitioning to the BIOS limits would be the only way to use large hard drive capacity. With newer SATA hard drives, there should be a jumper to restrict the data rate so older systems can access the drive. This way, a SATA III drive can be used on a SATA I or II mobo.
F@H.. to solve mankind's maladies.. in our lifetimes!
Karlsweldt
Mobo-fu Master
Mobo-fu Master
 
Posts: 20659
Joined: Wed Nov 12, 2003 11:57 am
Location: 07438

Bios successfull update

Postby leheremite » Sat Aug 13, 2011 4:41 pm

Thanks to remind me to take the battery off as well to put the jumper of configuration.
I do not have change anything on the hardware, I used before as OS Windows XP pro. Now Windows7 and before the BIOS update the both hard drive was recognize.

After the BIOS Update BF86510a.15a.0066. P07 the bios don't recognize the hard drive Primary Master & Slave. It recognize the DVD-RW in the secondary as Master.
I do not know if the CS in this configuration need to be or no. I do not have change anything and the jumper is on
Except the change on the BIOS nothing is changed hardware wise.
Cabling is correct.
I will try to play with the configuration jumper and the battery as you advised to do.
Keep you posted.

MK
leheremite
Pilgrim
Pilgrim
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Aug 02, 2011 11:56 am

PreviousNext

Return to BIOS

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests