Dual-Port Networking...

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Dual-Port Networking...

Postby SkyWlf77 » Fri Nov 05, 2010 11:56 am

Hi all...

It's been a while since I've posted here, but I've been lurking around occasionally. I've read through quite a few threads regarding networking and cabling, but have not found the answer I seek.

Is it possible to purchase a dual-port Gigabit NIC and configure the ports to have one as the incoming/download signal and one as the outgoing/upload signal?

My current setup is:
NewWave 15mb Cable Modem
D-Link 4-port Gigabit router (no wireless)
Cat 6 Enhanced Cabling throughout the house to 3 computers
-->First computer is WinXP MCE (this is the one I want to dual-port)
-->Second computer is WinXP Pro
-->Third computer is a Mac running OS X 10.3 Panther

The longest cabling run is 14 feet to the computer I want to run dual-port on. The other two computers are 7 foot and 3 foot runs.

Right now, all 3 computers are using onboard 100Mbps connections which is not capable of using the entire speed of the internet that we have. The other two computers will be upgraded to single-port Gigabit NIC cards, but this one is used to play FlightGear Flight Simulator over a Multiplayer network and the current connection can't handle it which is why I'd like to upgrade to a dual-port solution to get the most out of my internet connection speeds (which runs maxed out at 1250KB/sec down and 77KB/sec up when tested on a laptop with a Gigabit card).

So, is this possible or am I just dreaming? Also, is it necessary or will a single Gigabit connection handle the maximum speeds available from my internet connection?

Thanks!
Jason
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Postby Karlsweldt » Fri Nov 05, 2010 1:04 pm

Dual-port routers are more commonly known as having LAN ports and USB ports. Yes, there are routers or switches that are configured for dual services.. but are expensive. But if setting a dual-port router for one-way traffic on each port, you have to find a service provider that can accept that intent. Also expensive!
But all routers or switches have a single LAN port that is configured as an I/O port to a trunk or other service, such as a modem or server. But the more paths you add to a network, the slower data will flow. Keeping the paths direct is the best. Have you done a packet test directly from the newest computer with the Gigabit port, to see what you actually are getting? Then via each device through the router?
If using cat 6E cable, ensure it is more than a foot away from any electrical cables or RF sources.. as this can affect the packet speed! Plenum-cable is shielded to avoid this artifact.
But don't forget.. those servers on-line may have a lot of hosts to deal with.. so all connections may slow if the limit is reached. Just like rush-hour traffic on roads.
Best hook up is to feed the modem or router directly into a switch or hub, then each computer on the service ports. LAN is many times faster than USB 2.0 speeds. USB 3.0 is coming close.
Check out this Niagra 32065 dual-port card. And this Intel multi-port unit.
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Postby evasive » Fri Nov 05, 2010 2:21 pm

which is not capable of using the entire speed of the internet that we have.
100Mbit/sec

which runs maxed out at 1250KB/sec down and 77KB/sec up when tested on a laptop with a Gigabit card)
= 1,25Mbyte/sec -> 10Mbit/sec

That is it. Nothing more than 10Mbit/sec, that is the slowest part in the setup, due to the modem they say can run 15Mbit/sec maximum so anything below is fine according to your ISP. I think you should be glad you get the 10Mbit/sec out of it.

Now then, if you are talking about your LAN setup inside the house, that would be different. Please explain what you want to improve.
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Postby SkyWlf77 » Fri Nov 05, 2010 9:55 pm

Well, it looks like I won't be getting any additional internet speed out of this setup.

Since the Mac won't talk to the PC's and vice versa, there isn't much file transferring going on here, so increasing the overall intranet service isn't much of an issue.

I guess I will stick with a single-port Gigagbit card in all the machines and call it good since that'll be far more than my internet can handle anyway :(

Thanks for the quick response, evasive. At least if my small town ever gets any faster internet available, I'll be ready! :)

-Jason

PS: If I follow the math here, my internet won't exceed the Gigabit capabilities until the advertised internet speed hits 125Mb, correct? If so, does that speed even exist for residential service?
My Heatware: http://www.heatware.com/eval.php?id=48800

System 1: 3.4GHz AMD Phenom II X4, 8GB DDR3-1600 RAM, 1x500GB HDD & 1x1TB HDD, Palit GTS 250 1GB
System 2: 3.0GHz Core 2 Duo, 2GB DDR2-800 RAM, 120GB HDD, BFG 7800GTX 256MB
System 3: Dual-533MHz PowerMac G4 Digital Audio, 1.5GB RAM, 120GB HDD
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Postby fussnfeathers » Sat Nov 06, 2010 12:51 am

SkyWlf77 wrote:does that speed even exist for residential service?


No. 100mbit is the fastest at the moment, and it's not available in the US, only in a couple of Asian and European nations.
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Postby SkyWlf77 » Sat Nov 06, 2010 12:50 pm

Well, I did some research on our area as well as the fastest in the US and found some interesting information:

1) T1 (1.25Mbps) and T3 (44.3Mbps) lines are available in my area, but cost a minor fortune (the T1 line is listed at $1,700/month and the website for my local service provider wouldn't even tell me the cost for T3)

2) Comcast has now released 100Mbps service to Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota as well as San Francisco, CA and Atlanta, Georgia. Evidently, according to the press release, Chicago, Illinois as well as New York, New York and Washington DC metro are next on the list. (It'll be ages upon ages before that service comes close to where I live in the middle of nowhere.)

Ah, well. I don't mind what I have, really. It's quite reliable (I've had 3 downtimes over the past 2 1/2 years) and it's generally fast enough except when I'm playing FlightGear on the multiplayer network with a lot of planes in the air and even then it only stutters briefly when highly detailed models have to load in the area I am flying in or when I am flying at a high altitude and it has to render a lot of scenery all at one time while also loading nearby models and downloading the newest scenery on-the-fly. It's certainly a lot better than my old 6Mbps DSL line.

Thanks for all of the information, guys. It is much appreciated. Networking is not one of the areas I am good at. Once our home renovations are complete, I'll probably be back with some questions on how to configure the network here :)

-Jason
My Heatware: http://www.heatware.com/eval.php?id=48800

System 1: 3.4GHz AMD Phenom II X4, 8GB DDR3-1600 RAM, 1x500GB HDD & 1x1TB HDD, Palit GTS 250 1GB
System 2: 3.0GHz Core 2 Duo, 2GB DDR2-800 RAM, 120GB HDD, BFG 7800GTX 256MB
System 3: Dual-533MHz PowerMac G4 Digital Audio, 1.5GB RAM, 120GB HDD
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