Troops Out Of Iraq By August ????

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Postby fussnfeathers » Sat Aug 14, 2010 8:18 am

CivilDissent wrote:
fussnfeathers wrote:Former USAF, Gulf War vet, then active reserve.


do you not feel that unless you were a minimum of a 3 star general that you did not have all of the facts?


Absolutely. Although, to be honest, even the upper echelon didn't all have all the facts. The full birds and lieutenant generals knew more than the higher ups at the Pentagon. It's always a need to know basis, even in upper command. The benefit in my case was I was in the 33rd TFW (you can try googling my unit, but they're hard to find, they're not in Florida anymore) in flight/maintenance scheduling and field debriefing. Many of the reports the upper command got came from me and my team, and everything the pilots did came through me, pre, during, and post flight. If our birds did it, I knew it. Since we were a tenant unit, no base of our own, and first on the front..........there's still things I can't say a word about. Probably never will, not with all this going on. IF you do some digging, you'll find that my unit flew the most sorties, and had the highest kill rate of any at the time. Excellent unit, but always on edge. If there were a chance of conflict, we were there. So in that respect, I've got a better grip than somebody from, say, Nellis. We also worked very closely with the Marine units there, since they were our ground cover during air strikes.

High stress job, no?
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Postby CivilDissent » Sat Aug 14, 2010 7:03 pm

COOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

When I was about 10 years old, my friend and I used study the air force, etc. all the time. I could have told you every spec of the lockheed U-2, the SR-71, the history of the Cheyenne Mountain Operations Center and much, much more!

People such as yourself are extremely high my respect meter.

Note: Anytime you want to tell one of those stories that you can tell, I would love to hear it.
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Postby fussnfeathers » Sat Aug 14, 2010 7:51 pm

CivilDissent wrote:COOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Note: Anytime you want to tell one of those stories that you can tell, I would love to hear it.


Most of it would bore you to tears. :roll: If you were studying the SR-71 in detail, what was let out, anyway, you'd be, what, 21-22? About my older kid's age.

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The one in the middle was one of mine, early model. I worked more on the C's and D's back then.

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The left one I wore, AMU section, the right one was our William Tell designation. We won that sucker dang near every time.

"In 1990-91, the wing participated in the thwarting of Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein during Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The wing distinguished itself by scoring 16 aerial kills, the most of any single unit, including the first kill of the war. In addition to the kills, the 33d accomplished a number of firsts including: the most air-to-air kills, the most double kills and the most sorties and hours flown by any unit in the combat theater. The 33TFW, the only unit whose wing commander scored an air-to-air victory, destroyed the most MiG-29's (a total of five). Following Desert Shield/Storm, the Air Force restructured its forces. Under the new structure the 33d was re-designated the 33d Fighter Wing. The same year, it became the first fighter wing to bring the AIM-20 Advance Medium Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) into full combat capable service. "

I correct myself, they're back at Eglin again. I know they moved elsewhere in the late 90's for awhile, and the 59th got absorbed into another TFW. It's just the 58th and 60th now. I remember the AIM-20, the first time I saw one loaded on was when Panama hit, the response was so fast I didn't even know about it. I can tell you that date is wrong, it was experimental back then. It didn't reach the rest of the USAF until after Desert Storm.
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Postby CivilDissent » Sun Aug 15, 2010 10:36 am

fussnfeathers wrote:Most of it would bore you to tears. If you were studying the SR-71 in detail, what was let out, anyway, you'd be, what, 21-22? About my older kid's age.


If you are referring to age, no I am 44. I use to be able to tell you every spec. of alot of fighters, and bombers. No more though.

My memory is not too good anymore, because of my medicines, but I do remember Skunk Works. Those Eagles and Phantom are nice. That is a dream of mine.... to have just a small ride in one of those planes!

Oh well, maybe someday. :wink:

Seems to me I remember someone getting shot down in one but now that I think of it, I think that was a U-2. Gary something I believe.
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Postby fussnfeathers » Sun Aug 15, 2010 2:26 pm

Yep, that was all over the place for awhile. The only U-2 to get caught, let alone brought down. I've been up in an F-15D twice, both times with my favorite crazoid, Capt. Cross. That guy, on one training flight, had his in-flight checklist that's supposed to be firmly velcroed to your leg, fall off and hit the floor. Since he couldn't bend over, he did what any roller coaster fanatic knew would work........put the plane into a loop, then flip so the canopy was on the outside a third of the way through. Worked perfectly, the checklist shot up off the floor and hit the canopy. BUT, just over two thirds of the way through, he ripped the left wing off the plane from the stress. Son of a b**** managed to land the plane without ejecting, came screaming in almost sideways, flipped horizontal just in time for the remaining two wheels to hit ground, and threw the engines into reverse. In-frigging-sane. Hey, he didn't know the wings couldn't take that kind of reverse stress. :o I still had him take me up twice for incentive rides, though, he didn't try TOO hard to make me brown out and puke in my mask.

You'll be able to find out more about the Blackbird now, it was decomissioned in '98, and the great majority of specs released to the public, since it was outdated and no longer in use. I've been near a couple, but not inside like I've been in Eagles and Falcons. One Harrier, watching that Brit fly in and land was awesome at the time.

A girl I've been talking with a lot's son is a drone pilot, getting ready to head to Afghanistan soon.
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Postby CivilDissent » Sun Aug 15, 2010 4:29 pm

Yea, it seems they took the Blackbird in and out of service many times.

If I am not mistaken, there is one on a carrier in a port in Washington D.C., or somewhere along there. My wife and I toured the East coast one time and I seem to remember going on some tourist guised small carrier, along the lines of the Guadelcanal, and it had some old planes and possibly a Blackbird on it.

I would not be able to take too much in so versatile/tactical fighters. I would puke in no time. I get dizzy just looking at a fast moving car.

How in the world did he land a plane with one of the wings missing? That sounds impossible!?!

Speaking of Harriers, how many types of V/STOLs have you come across? That is another thing. There is the Harrier, which I believe is British, and, I forget the name but I believe the US has V/STOL fighter jets also. Of course, planes like the F-16 can be STOL but I mean literally VTOL.
I have never heard of lot of these http://vstol.org/wheel.htm.

One thing to think about though is that with the media always coverring things such as the drones, it is amazing what the US military probably has now, along the lines of a Blackbird, that pilots might be flying over Iraq, Afghanistan, etc. They are probably flying planes that are twice as fast and go twice as high as a Blackbird. :D That is what always kept me amazed!

A drone pilot? You mean from the ground with some sort of stick, or computer, to fly the drone? I did not think those things had pilots on board
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Postby fussnfeathers » Sun Aug 15, 2010 7:04 pm

Yep, full flight sim setup, basically, wired to his drone overseas. He's going into rotation there for awhile, they do have some "pilots" on location. Right now, he's in............can't tell ya. I can't remember. :lol: There are no pilots on board, they're glorified remote control planes.
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Postby Ripshod » Mon Aug 16, 2010 7:22 am

How in the world did he land a plane with one of the wings missing? That sounds impossible!?!


Have a look HERE

Shows how durable those F15s are. And that's why I am humbled at the skills of some of those pilots. fussnfeathers, I was under some of your boys in '91, take a salute from a british squaddie.. PDT_Armataz_01_37

You may say 'FLUKE' or that he was just lucky. The skills part was recognising that his craft was still controlable.

Oh, and the USAF and Navy use an adaptation of the British Harrier, essentially the same craft.
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Postby fussnfeathers » Mon Aug 16, 2010 7:48 am

Mmmm.............well, it's rather obvious, but the engines on those birds are fuselage mounted, not wing. Those in the vid are D models (the one I got to fly in) as they had two seats. A, C, and E models are single seaters. The other giveaway is the drop tank locations. Regular flight fuel is stored in the wings themselves, which was why he couldn't see from the spray. Even with the wing ripped off, you've still got a hell of a lot of torque on that side, so it's possible to kick in the afterburner (and let me tell you, until you've stood a few hundred yards away from one of those kicking in at takeoff, you haven't felt anything) and keep going straight, with your attitude adjusted to make up for the lack of lift on one side. The dual rudders help with that as well, they can be split to work independently of each other.

Neat stuff. And a pair of F15's at full throttle taking off at dusk is a sight you just don't forget.
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Postby fussnfeathers » Mon Aug 16, 2010 7:59 am

Ripshod wrote:
How in the world did he land a plane with one of the wings missing? That sounds impossible!?!


Have a look HERE

Shows how durable those F15s are. And that's why I am humbled at the skills of some of those pilots. fussnfeathers, I was under some of your boys in '91, take a salute from a british squaddie.. PDT_Armataz_01_37

You may say 'FLUKE' or that he was just lucky. The skills part was recognising that his craft was still controlable.

Oh, and the USAF and Navy use an adaptation of the British Harrier, essentially the same craft.


You wouldn't have seen me, I was in Kuwait mostly, the 33TFW is small, can't say how small now, but not the size you'd think from the records. PDT_Armataz_01_25
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