What features do you use most on Motherboards.org

For discussions related to the main web site or the forum itself are now combined into one to clean things up a bit..

What features do you use most on Motherboards.org

I just use the forums
21
72%
Mobo ID Tools
0
No votes
Manufacturer's Database
0
No votes
MoboCop
0
No votes
Mobot
0
No votes
Motherboard Ranking
8
28%
 
Total votes : 29

Postby ajaskerritt » Sun Jun 23, 2002 8:11 pm

:lol: WOW youre faster than McDonalds drivethru lol. Off the top of my head, lets see: 1. basic info on monitors what to look for and what the specs really mean. 2. with all of the different speeds of this and that (mobos, vid cards, memory, hds, etc) putting components together to avoid or limiting bottlenecks. Its sometimes confusing because it seems some people are using some numbers while others on some other scale. Yes I am fairly new at this, but I have done a ton of reading on this board and some others. 3. Maybe, I don't know about this one. Some example systems periodically that the moderators think particularly well and why. I have seen the mobo reviews. For example, I am thinking a good middle of the road system some people could just look at or a super high end power system that maybe you guys have put together. etc. 4. I already posted this elsewhere, but a vapochill review. 5. maybe some direction on making a super quiet system (insulation, quiet fans do they work as well?, etc.). I'm sure i can think of more but thats all for now. you guys are awsome by the way thanks.
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Postby datektrader21 » Sun Jun 23, 2002 9:11 pm

i have a good one. instead of emailing notices about replies to post could we get them pmed
Two muffins are baking in an oven. one muffin says to the other,"hey man its getting pretty hot in here" "Holy $%^!@#" the other muffin replys " A talking muffin!" MaximMAg
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Postby Toby B. » Sun Jun 23, 2002 9:17 pm

Datektrader if you so choose to not have emails for response then go to your profile and change the setting!!!

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Postby Aussie » Mon Jun 24, 2002 3:02 am

There is a huge demand for a comprehensive How To article covering the "won't boot" problem. A large proportion of the posts in the Technical Support forum are for exactly this problem.

A step by step troubleshooting guide to solving this problem would be an enormous help both to posters and moderators.

The closest that I can find to an example of what is required is this:-

http://arstechnica.com/ask-ars/1999/ask-old-31.html

Do you reckon you could twist Doc's arm enough to get him to do something similar?


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Postby Toby B. » Mon Jun 24, 2002 3:14 am

Aussie wrote:There is a huge demand for a comprehensive How To article covering the "won't boot" problem. A large proportion of the posts in the Technical Support forum are for exactly this problem.

A step by step troubleshooting guide to solving this problem would be an enormous help both to posters and moderators.

The closest that I can find to an example of what is required is this:-

http://arstechnica.com/ask-ars/1999/ask-old-31.html

Do you reckon you could twist Doc's arm enough to get him to do something similar?


Aussie


Ausie, what a great idea......... :wink: If an article is to be written to discuss "no boot" problems, could it please include proper ways to test power supplies (AT, ATX, LPX, etc...)....The repair manuals I have have the wrong specs for voltage (I had a mini-discussion with Hardware Junkie on testing power supplies - I trust what he told me).....

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Postby Aussie » Mon Jun 24, 2002 3:32 am

The average user that posts to the forums probably hasn't the necessary equipment for testing power supplies anyway.

I would suggest that most troubleshooting is limited to "replace and test" methods for the average user.

Maybe a power supply testing article could be done separately for the benefit of those with the necessary gear and knowledge?


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Postby Toby B. » Mon Jun 24, 2002 4:57 am

Aussie wrote:The average user that posts to the forums probably hasn't the necessary equipment for testing power supplies anyway.

I would suggest that most troubleshooting is limited to "replace and test" methods for the average user.

Maybe a power supply testing article could be done separately for the benefit of those with the necessary gear and knowledge?


Aussie
Well, isn't a basic digital multimeter approximately the same price as a new power supply??? Your "replace and test" theory to me seems like you're saying: "your computer is dead for some reason; go buy a whole array of new componets to try and narrow it down"<<<----kind of expensive don't you think???

If the average visitor to the forums is up to the challenge of fixing a hardware problem for the first time - especially a no post situation; then they would probably benifit themselves by learing the proper testing tools and proceedures. Rather then the replace and test theory. Someone like me, who has a ton of spare components, can swap out parts to test. whereas a person that has only one computer has to go buy components to try and figure out the problem.

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Postby Aussie » Mon Jun 24, 2002 5:54 am

The "replace and test" principle is the basis of troubleshooting for those that don't have access to testing facilities for the various computer components and that's most of us after all isn't it.

Having to purchase a replacement power supply in order to "replace and test" is a worst case scenario, many users would have a second machine they could swap the power supply out of or a friend they could borrow one from if they didn't have a spare handy. Even in the worst case scenario of having to purchase a replacement unit for testing purposes if it turned out that it wasn't required it could be returned for credit.

Your suggestion of purchasing a digital multimeter to test the power supply is probably valid for a person that knows how to use the tool, is going to get continued use from it and can afford the additional outlay but is hardly valid for a one-time user.

Consider the scenario:-

System won't boot - suspect power supply - buy multimeter and test - power supply tests as faulty - now have to spend more money to buy replacement.

Or.

System won't boot - suspect power supply - buy multimeter and test - power supply tests OK - money spent and problem still not solved.

User now has a tool that he will most likely never use again or an item he has to return for credit.

The above is assuming that the "tester" has the necessary skills, knowledge and ability to use a multimeter effectively for testing.

Now consider this scenario:-

System won't boot - suspect power supply - buy replacement power supply and fit - problem solved - money spent but problem solved.

Or.

System won't boot - suspect power supply - buy replacement power supply and fit - problem not solved - money spent and problem still not solved.

User now has a spare power supply that he may have some use for in the future or an item he has to return for credit.

Replacing a power supply is a relatively quick and easy straight forward process with no special skills necessary only common sense.

While it could be argued that your theory has some merit in the area of power supplies it certainly wouldn't apply to other components such as memory modules, processors and video cards where the only viable testing method available to the average user is to replace the suspect component with another or to test the suspect component in another machine if one is available.

I rest my case. :lol:


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Postby datektrader21 » Mon Jun 24, 2002 7:31 am

Australians....so logical :lol:
Two muffins are baking in an oven. one muffin says to the other,"hey man its getting pretty hot in here" "Holy $%^!@#" the other muffin replys " A talking muffin!" MaximMAg
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Postby Aussie » Mon Jun 24, 2002 7:45 am

Australians....so logical


The application of logic is essential in the troubleshooting of PC's.

Patience, logic and a cool head are the principal requirements in fact.

By the way I do know of quite a few "illogical" Australians. :lol:


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