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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 8:00 pm 
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Location: Stanford, CA
Thanks for that story it was quite entertaining...maybe it'll take the place of Goldy Locks and the three bears in my childrens bedtime story collection. As for RISC here's a little history :

The first RISC projects came from IBM, Stanford, and UC-Berkeley in the late 70s and early 80s. The IBM 801, Stanford MIPS, and Berkeley RISC 1 and 2 were all designed with a similar philosophy which has become known as RISC. Certain design features have been characteristic of most RISC processor features :

one cycle execution time: RISC processors have a CPI (clock per instruction) of one cycle. This is due to the optimization of each instruction on the CPU and a technique called pipelining. Pipelining is a techique that allows for simultaneous execution of parts, or stages, of instructions to more efficiently process instructions; large number of registers: the RISC design philosophy generally incorporates a larger number of registers to prevent in large amounts of interactions with memory. This feature is what made RISC appealing to Industry however, Because processor speeds have increased, CISC chips are now able to execute more than one instruction within a single clock. This also allows CISC chips to make use of pipelining. With other technological improvements, it is now possible to fit many more transistors on a single chip. This gives RISC processors enough space to incorporate more complicated, CISC-like commands. RISC chips also make use of more complicated hardware, making use of extra function units for superscalar execution. Hence the popularity of RISC chips in industry...

But who knows maybe it's all about law suits....mmm...muffin tastes good

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 8:23 pm 
It is very difficult to write about computer development, if you don't understand what you are writing. In formal education, you need prerequisit courses to be able to use the proper terminology to explain everything.

Self taught experts without formal education often had the problem of using the wrong words to describe some laws of physics or chemistry. In the case here, you are quoting very old technology without a time reference. So it sounded disjointed. Pipelining, or hypertransport pipeline data transfer is how we say things today, that is the MIPS invention, not about millions of instructions per second that hypertransport pipeline can handle..

Any way you had fun on us. You forgot to mention Amdahl's IBM 370 which is not a risc.

Good luck. have fun. Life is too short.


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 8:37 pm 
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Don't you mean the System/360 Released by IBM in '64? That's the system that paved the way for CISC to dominate. But who knows...I'm only self tought...
BTW the term CISC was derived from this Computer

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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 9:12 pm 
the difference of system 360 and IBM 370(size 4'x6'x5' displayed in East Fishkill facility) is in the catalog,

IBM 370 is a 64 bit computer, which later developed into a PC370 which composed of only two card to be installed in a PC ISA slots. It uses two 68040 32 bit cpus to handle all the 370 instructions except one. The second card has 2 mb of 8 bit drams. I bought it to study 64 bit computer architecture for $1000.00. It was cheap but not a good investment as Cray for $5000.00.

System 360 and later system 380 are departmental computers. They were 32 bit computers of the entry level nature.

When you write like that, people know you are self taught. The trick is only quote what books had, never change a word. Nobody will know the difference then. I started my semiconductor business and quoted only the bell telephone 3 volumes of transistor technology. Nobody found out I was self taught.

Once you learn that try to write here again. See if any one can tell?


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 9:25 pm 
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This stuff is a fascinating read. And atang - there is no way in hell that you'd come off as self taught. You seem to be more along the lines of one of those white lab coard/bunny suit people....


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2003 9:44 pm 
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What version of the 370 did you purchace? Was it one of the models with virtual memory? Anyways, we're way off topic...If you'd like start a thread about the history of computers I'd be more than happy to interject.

<---Self taught Muffin Baker :lol:

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2003 7:38 am 
Virtual memeory is in the hard disk unfortunately.


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