GTX 295 setup?

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Postby Twisty » Sat Nov 30, 2013 10:12 am

It is a brand new build. I know the temps are OK but I am very demanding and the temps will go up when I get a decent PSU in and start overclocking. The CPU is before the GPU in the loop and has half the TDP of each GPU package so should be running cooler than the GPUs.

The waterblock has a convex surface and it is quite hard to judge what tension on the screws is best for getting a good contact area. Plus despite only being a year old I think my akasa 455 heatsink paste had split making it hard to apply. I used a a tube of Arctic Silver 3 for years and it never let me down, I might try getting a tube of Arctic Silver 5 to see if that works as well.

I based my '2/3rd the power' assumption on Intels own TDP specs of 89W for the Prescott 2.8E and 65W for the core2.

At one point I was folding with both a Piii 650E (oc'd to 866Mhz) and a P4 3.0 HT. They both got similar PPD unless the P4 was picking up SSE2 WU's :o I think Intel got the pipeline a bit wrong on the P4's although I believe Prescott was a big step up compared to the previous P4 steppings.
I have now left the Building :tongue8:
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Postby Karlsweldt » Sun Dec 01, 2013 8:00 am

Intel has several lines of processor types. Most common were the Celeron, Northwood and Prescott. Then of course the commercial model of Xeon and others. The central core or CPU needs to access instruction sets frequently. Having an adjacent cache of fair size means faster processing times. The Celeron typically had only 128K to 256K cache.. the Northwood could have 512K cache on most models. The Prescott could have up to 1M cache for instruction sets. Typically running at full- or half-speed of the final FSB, it is more efficient than repetitive trips back to the program source for instructions.
Today, you have multi-core CPU types up to 8 dual cores in some models. Could be up to 8 megs or more of cache memory on the CPU die! Those cores can operate independently or collectively, resulting in great processing prowess. Depends on the program and OS instructions.
The latest advance in computing is having the memory controller on the same die as the CPU. Shaves microseconds from memory access, and gives a faster system result.
Any design of a heat sink requires proper tension to ensure the most efficient heat transfer. Most are highly engineered to be 'idiot proof' as to installation, with springs providing proper tension versus the basic tightening of screws. The screws have "shoulders' to limit the range of the springs, ensuring optimal pressure for contact and heat transfer.
A water-cooling setup is the most efficient, and can 'move' more unwanted heat out of the system than regular fans. But an anti-freeze should be added, a non-toxic type. Aids in the absorption of heat and helps prevent bacteria build-up.
F@H.. to solve mankind's maladies.. in our lifetimes!
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Postby Twisty » Tue Dec 03, 2013 1:59 am

Antifreeze generally refers to glycol or equivalent that has a lower freezing point than water, used in car cooling systems etc. People shouldn't put that in their computer unless they are running phase change, peltier or otherwise subjecting their computer to sub-zero temps. FOr normal watercooled computers people use an additive or premix that is anti fungal and anti-corrosion and not antifreeze.

I could continue discussing CPU's but I feel it is pointless because I'll just get another reply with random information that talks down to me as if I am a complete n00b.
I have now left the Building :tongue8:
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Postby Karlsweldt » Wed Dec 04, 2013 7:40 am

The anti-freeze referred to is non-toxic, commonly used by people to winterize RVs.. propylene glycol. Also found as an additive in many foods.
I would never recommend using ethylene glycol or similar products, due to high toxicity!
While plain water is very efficient at heat transfer, the Ph level must be neutral.. or corrosion of parts is an expected outcome.
Definitely, some anti-fungal ingredient and other additive is needed.. to offer some lubrication qualities to the pump, and create an unfavorable medium for bacteria.

You are not viewed as a "n00b" in any sense.. unless you are doing this for the first time, with little knowledge of the field. We all were there at one time.
It isn't the intent of "talking down" to you or any other member about computer parts or use.. several hundred visitors to the Forum may find the information posted to be useful, and resolve problems they have.. or give incentive to follow a similar course.
I am always thankful for an explanation of "how it works" or how a process should or should not be done. Any criticism of my thoughts or practices are considered "constructive". We are never 'too old' to learn new methods or try new ventures.
F@H.. to solve mankind's maladies.. in our lifetimes!
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