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Postby Karlsweldt » Tue Feb 05, 2008 8:58 am

Here is a reference link for all processor types from Intel.
And Processor Socket Types:
For the Pentium III class from Intel.
For the Pentium II class from Intel.
The core voltage ranged from 1.35 volts to 1.75 volts.. and some early models used a 2.0 volt core.
The Pentium II and Pentium III class were somewhat interchangeable, if in the cartridge package.

There are socket adapters known as "Lin-Lin" that allow setting the voltage/bus ranges with jumpers.. for some non-supported processors on some mobos.
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Postby Twisty » Tue Feb 05, 2008 1:23 pm

quite right. I missed out the word 'coppermine' from my last post - hence totally confusing the issue and taking this post rather OT, my apologies.

The point I was making was all coppermine celes were socket 370, whereas the PIII coppermines came in both slot 1 and socket 370.

Back OT, if you want to try OCing that cele, try getting your hands on some PC100 RAM, with a bit of luck you may be able to run it on a 100Mhz bus, but the usual overclocking risks apply.
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Postby Karlsweldt » Wed Feb 06, 2008 8:00 am

Not all processors that "fit" the socket class are compatible.
Certain pins on the newer CPUs are for specific keying to control the core and I/O voltage, bus speed and ratio. Plus access to internal cache memory.
A few of the Socket 370 and Slot 1 setups had some jumpers to set.. but most of the models used an auto-set process. With today's socket types, there seldom is any controlling jumper on the mobo that is for the CPU setup. Almost all feature control is via the 'soft-set' from the BIOS pages.
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Postby Pette Broad » Wed Feb 06, 2008 5:10 pm

Karlsweldt wrote:Not all processors that "fit" the socket class are compatible.
Certain pins on the newer CPUs are for specific keying to control the core and I/O voltage, bus speed and ratio. Plus access to internal cache memory.
A few of the Socket 370 and Slot 1 setups had some jumpers to set.. but most of the models used an auto-set process. With today's socket types, there seldom is any controlling jumper on the mobo that is for the CPU setup. Almost all feature control is via the 'soft-set' from the BIOS pages.


Yes, the early P2's/370's had a few jumpers to set. My first Intel P2 board had a setup jumper which you had to short then go into the Bios and change the speed. Setting up an Asus 333 board was a nightmare but compared to some Super Socket 7 boards even that was a piece of cake :)

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