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PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2015 1:32 am 
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Pilgrim
Pilgrim

Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2015 1:11 am
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Hello guys,

I'm a software and website developer with a bit of an enthusiasm for great-graphics games. I'm looking forward on assembling a quality system. The budget is pretty limitted right now, but I look forward to expanding the system capabilities in the near future.

My question is: Gaming oriented mobos seems to have lasting and reliable components, but the same chipset mobos are available without the gaming tag for a much cheaper price. Is it ok for me to buy a non-gaming mobo and not change it for the next 6-7yrs?

My current budget means i'll have to go with an i3-4150, a 450watt corsair power supply, no graphic card and 4gb ddr3 1600Mhz RAM. I plan on upgrading in a couple of years with a powerful i5 and a good 2gb gddr5 gc. (Would the PSU be enough when I do this upgrade?)

Also pointing out I wouldn't be overclocking and I'm not too concerned about the looks or the onboard audio... I play games like skyrim, assassins creed, cod, etc in the best 'available' graphics settings...

For example: asus b85 pro gamer or gigabyte ga h97 d3h. The gigabyte is cheaper, feature packed and also supports 22nm, but asus is gamer...

Thanx in advance...
:)


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 13, 2015 10:44 am 
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Mobo-fu Master
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Welcome to Motherboards org.
A 'gaming' computer motherboard may not appear much different than a 'regular' motherboard. But likely has some extra non-physical features. With on-board video, the gaming aspect is not as good as with a video card having its own memory. The CPU must do rendering as well as data handling. And an upper portion of the main memory is dedicated to video needs. Best not to go beyond 25% of total system memory for this 'video aperture' setting. 2 GB total is recommended for OS needs.
A 450 watt PSU might be adequate for a starter system, but power needs for an upgrade could go beyond 700 watts.. of a good brand PSU. Good video cards of 1 GB or so do give a great gaming experience, but may need over 150 watts of power for its use.
As to a case, choose a full tower design. More room for upgrades, more space to work in. And options for better case ventilation. Plus almost every hardware item is likely to fit without a hassle.

If going with 4 GB memory, you will need a 64-bit OS version. The 32-bit version can properly utilize only about 3.5 GB total, including any devices with their own memory.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 1:11 am 
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Pilgrim
Pilgrim

Joined: Sun Dec 13, 2015 1:11 am
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Thank you for your detailed answer... :D

Yes, I understand the onboard graphics of 512MB wont be anywhere as good as a dedicated video card, but can't afford one. But that's ok, considering that I would b concentrating more on work than games for the next few years, eventhough that includes a bit of Photoshop and Illustrator works... :(

I'm not very clear about the 'gaming' mobo dilemma though... I have heard the capacitors in those mobos are more resistent to prolonged heat, it has overclocking features, better heat dissipation sinks etc... But these wont be a huge problem for me, since the system will be hosted on a custom built ATX chassis, with adequate air flow and that I wouldn't be overclocking. I would be using a PCI audio card, so the onboard audio and the EMI audio section shielding wont b important either. So, is there still some reasons that I might want to consider a gaming board before chosing my motherboard (or have I got something wrong in the above mentioned 'beliefs')?


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 6:40 am 
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Capacitors used where higher temperatures are expected are rated at 105°C, where common ratings are around 85°C. And with most electronics above "general" designs, low-ESR types are preferred. That results in less leakage from higher voltage circuits to lower voltage circuits. ESR equates to 'equivalent series resistance'.
Of course one has to stay within a budget. But to buy a motherboard that won't do all the future needs, and have to replace same, is costly and not a preferred path. CPU and other upgrades are acceptable as normal expenses.
True, premium 'gaming' motherboards may have higher quality components.. and may have a better service life than lesser ones. But if a proper operating environment is had, either should have a long service life. Higher ambient temperatures create more system waste heat to expel.
On-board sound systems are rather good, unless you have need of special audio ambiance.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 8:40 am 
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Pilgrim
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Thanx, that was very helpful. So, I've decided to go with a gaming gene mobo. I've seen a few online (my budget is around 11k INR):
MSI H97 Gaming 3
Asus B85 PRO Gamer
Asus H97 PRO Gamer
Asus B150 PRO Gaming D3
(In order of preference based on features and price)

But I'm not quite sure about MSI mobos. Asus seems to be a trustworthy brand, but offers much less features and that too at a higher price range. Switching to the 6th gen may cost me a bit more and also without a ddr4 ram I am not sure the 6th gen is worth it. The motherboard is going to be an important investment for me, since I might stick with just upgrading components for the next 7+ yrs...

Please help me pick one. If you have a better suggestion, I'll b happy to consider that... Leaving this to the experts... :D


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 9:07 am 
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Pilgrim
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The maximum configuration I would be attempting to achieve with future upgrades would be:
* Core i5 >3.8GHz at max turbo
* 2x4GB RAM
* R9 270 2GB GDDR5 Graphics or better
* 2 SSDs - 128 or 256 or both, 1TB rotary HDD (Might not use RAID since I would also b working on this. Will use M.2 SSD if available)
* PCI/-E NIC with WiFi
* Triple monitor, possibly full hd.
* 600-750 watt PSU
* a min of 2 USB3.0 ports in front panel
* Headphone jack in front panel.

Yup, thats pretty much it... Please give your opinion... :)


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 9:35 am 
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Pilgrim
Pilgrim

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Also, just for the sake of saving money, I would name few non-gaming mobos:
Asus H97 PRO
Asus B150 PLUS D3
Asus H170 PLUS D3
Gigabyte GA H97 D3H
(Not in preference order)

And another gamer i just noted (though very expensive): MSI H170 Gaming M3 DDR4


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 4:55 pm 
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Mobo-fu Master
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The ultimate choice of a motherboard is your decision. It has to do what you want, not someone else's plan. But recommendations and suggestions can be taken as thoughts.
Sites such as "Tom's Hardware" and "Hard Core Gamers" do rate motherboards. You can always go to the motherboard manufacturer's site for specs, and compare for what best fills your need.
Most motherboards can have a BIOS update to be compliant with a lot of newer features and CPU types. But memory is most proficient if in dual or triple channel configuration. Higher bandwidth.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 14, 2015 7:18 pm 
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Pilgrim
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Ok... Thanx. :) I'll have a look at it...


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