FAT 32 to NTFS

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FAT 32 to NTFS

Postby maddmaxx » Mon Aug 26, 2002 11:22 am

Oooops. Got so excited I posted as a reply instead of a topic. Need to know how to convert from FAT 32 to NTSF in XP without reformatting????? I have 2x 80gbs Diamond max HDs. :?
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Postby wolverineman85 » Mon Aug 26, 2002 11:50 am

Honestly, unless you REALLY need NTSF, I dont reccommend it. I switched a while ago and havent seen much difference between the two. As for not being able to reformat, I am not completly sure, cause I did it when I reformatted. My dad has had some problems with compatiblity. Sometimes he has problems bringing files from work and using them on the computer. May just be something funky with his computer at work, but we didnt seem to encounter these problems when we had FAT 32. Hope this helps some.
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Postby Phillipste » Mon Aug 26, 2002 1:29 pm

I think you go to "My Computer"; right click on the harddrive and select properties. Something there will offer to upgrade the PC to NTFS.

My biggest reason for using NTFS is secuity. My son and his friends use my PCs. My work and other stuff is in a private directory. Under XP he cannot see this without my password. You can further increase the security by encrypting the directory. You cannot do this with FAT32.
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Postby Zero » Mon Aug 26, 2002 2:09 pm

yes but there are other encrytion software you dont need to convert to ntfs for security there are like thousands od secuurit software for fat32
ya i know i suck at typing
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Postby Wyrm73 » Wed Aug 28, 2002 8:41 pm

NTFS also makes smaller cluster sizes on large drives. This means less wasted space from half used clusters.

As for how to do convert, I used Partition Magic. Works great, but costs $70. Kind of expensive for one use, but well worth the money if you plan on using it.
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Postby feto » Wed Aug 28, 2002 10:14 pm

i know that when using ntfs you dont need to defrag your hard drive as often as you do using fat32 since it has a newer way of storing files.....also..it does not do scan discs like fat32......
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Postby Zero » Thu Aug 29, 2002 1:38 am

Wyrm wrote:NTFS also makes smaller cluster sizes on large drives. This means less wasted space from half used clusters.

As for how to do convert, I used Partition Magic. Works great, but costs $70. Kind of expensive for one use, but well worth the money if you plan on using it.

hehe just wat i need i am using only 8.9ghb but 16gb becuzz of cluster space i guess i will be switching very soon
ya i know i suck at typing
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Postby Thestonecutter » Thu Aug 29, 2002 7:49 pm

Phillipste wrote:I think you go to "My Computer"; right click on the harddrive and select properties. Something there will offer to upgrade the PC to NTFS.

My biggest reason for using NTFS is secuity. My son and his friends use my PCs. My work and other stuff is in a private directory. Under XP he cannot see this without my password. You can further increase the security by encrypting the directory. You cannot do this with FAT32.


This is why i switched to NTFS, security, and stability, and yes i upgraded to NTFS when i installed XP!
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Postby Phillipste » Fri Aug 30, 2002 5:38 am

To reiterate, I had tried some third party encryption tools for 98. None worked as well or seamlessly at XP (Granted it has been a few years and they may have improved).

Using XP each user has My Documents. I have two directories under My Documents. One is just private and the other is private and encrypted. Other users who log on cannot get into them. My login has a password and administrative rights. My son has a login with NO Password and most rights. We have another login called "Friends" that can only run apps.

My PC is Home Networked and from other XP machines I can still access my Private Files using my login.

Some of my work stuff is client sensitive and some I just don't want my son to accidentially delete. Lastly I know my Girlfriend can not browse through my Microsoft Money files. :oops:
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Converting volume to NTFS from FAT 16 or FAT 32

Postby matt451 » Fri Aug 30, 2002 9:35 am

You can find lot's of information on the microsoft website. Here is the command line way to convert using the convert.exe executable. It is easier than it looks and you shouldn't need to worry about the registry remedies listed below, most users never need to go that far.

To convert FAT16 and FAT32 volumes to NTFS, use Convert.exe from the command line. The syntax of Convert follows:

convert volume: /fs:ntfs [/v] [/x] [/cvtarea:filename] [/nosecurity] [/?]
Table 13.11 describes the parameters available with Convert.

Table 13.11 Convert Parameters

Parameter Description
volume Specifies drive letter (followed by a colon), mounted drive, or volume name that you want to convert.
/fs:ntfs Specifies that you want to convert the volume to NTFS.
/v Specifies verbose mode. All messages are displayed during conversion.
/x Causes the volume to dismount, if necessary, before it is formatted. Any open handles to the volume become invalid.
/cvtarea:filename Specifies that the MFT and other NTFS metadata files are written to an existing, contiguous placeholder file. This file must be in the root folder of the volume to be converted.
/nosecurity Specifies that you do not want to apply default NTFS permissions to the volume. Using the convert command together with the /nosecurity parameter mimics the behavior of the convert command in Windows 2000.
/? Displays user help.

Converting Volumes in Use
When you use the convert command, you might see the following messages:

Convert cannot run because the volume is in use by another process. Convert may run if this volume is dismounted first. ALL OPEN HANDLES TO THIS VOLUME WOULD THEN BE INVALID. Would you like to force a dismount on this volume (Y/N)?

-or-

Convert cannot gain exclusive access to the [driveletter] drive, so it cannot convert it now. Would you like to schedule it to be converted the next time the system restarts (Y/N)?

Caution

Forcefully dismounting a volume can cause data loss if files are open when the volume is dismounted. Therefore, the safest way to convert a volume that cannot be locked is to schedule the conversion to take place when the computer restarts.
These messages appear if any of the following three conditions exist.

The current folder (where you run the Convert command) is on the volume to be converted For example, you cannot immediately convert the F volume if you type convert f: /fs:ntfs at the F:\> prompt. If you have multiple volumes, you can solve this problem by changing to a folder on another volume (by typing c: for example) and retyping the command to start the conversion. If you have only one volume, you must schedule the conversion to occur the next time you start Windows XP Professional.

A program has a file open on the volume to be converted To solve this problem, close all programs that might be accessing the volume and ensure that remote users are not accessing files on the volume from across the network. If this does not work, run the command again and type Y to dismount the volume. If you do not want to dismount the volume, type N. Convert then prompts you to schedule the conversion to occur the next time you restart the computer.

Windows XP Professional is installed on the volume to be converted, or the volume contains the paging file You cannot convert the Windows XP Professional boot volume while Windows XP Professional is running, nor can you force a dismount of the volume that contains the paging file. In these situations, you must schedule the conversion to occur the next time you start Windows XP Professional.

If you must restart the computer to complete the conversion, Windows XP Professional provides a 10-second delay before the conversion begins.

If necessary, you can cancel the conversion before the computer restarts by editing the registry.

Caution

Do not edit the registry unless you have no alternative. The registry editor bypasses standard safeguards, allowing settings that can damage your system, or even require you to reinstall Windows. If you must edit the registry, back it up first and see the Registry Reference in the Microsoft Windows 2000 Server Resource Kit at http://www.microsoft.com/reskit.
To edit the registry and cancel an NTFS conversion before the computer restarts

Click Start, click Run, and then type:
regedit.exe

Click OK.
In the registry editor, navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM \CurrentControlSet\Control\Session Manager.
Delete the following value from the BootExecute entry, where x is the volume that is to be converted:
autocheck autoconv \??\x: /FS:NTFS

Close the registry editor.
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