How essential are the capacitors in power supply cables

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How essential are the capacitors in power supply cables

Postby LakaWaka » Mon Oct 17, 2016 6:38 pm

I am looking to do some custom sleeving on my PSU cables, but upon research found there are some double cables which have capacitors connected.
I am thinking about doing the cables with the capacitors on, but curious if there is a possibility of leaving them off and just making new cables? The aftermarket cables do not have any capacitors, so it seems it is okay to not have them, but I am curious about performance loss, or anything like that. I have heard that you really need to be pushing the power supply for those capacitors to matter. I hear that the capacitors are also used for "ripple suppression" and "EMI suppression." There were also comments that the dual wires are used for "voltage regulation" which also seems to be for when higher wattage is being used by the PSU.
So I am curious how important both the double wires are, as well as the capacitors. The MB is a 24pin and the PSU is a 28 pin (12+8 I believe).
I could also get another PSU, but no real reason to.
But I could also try to sleeve around the capacitors, even though people dislike doing split sleeving. There is also the issue of sleeving around the capacitor. Would it do anything to the capacitor if the ends of the wires would get hot? You can seal the paracord sleeving to the wire by heating it, but that would be close to the capacitor... Although you do solder the wires at very high temps, but the lighter's flame is very wide compared to a soldering iron tip, so I don't know if a cap would catch on fire, or worse, of it got hot.
There is also the option of sleeving the capacitor, but not sure if it would get too hot (doubtful since it's sleeved in the OEM sleeve I am using now). I might just try to sleeve over the capacitor, but not sure if it would cause an issue being too tight around the capacitor, so I might have to get bigger paracord.

Thanks for any help.
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Re: How essential are the capacitors in power supply cables

Postby Karlsweldt » Tue Oct 18, 2016 6:10 am

Solid sheathing around wires is not a good idea, unless intended to insulate the wires from excess heat. But that can also work in reverse, softening the insulation of the wires. Best for general use is open-weave sheathing.
The extra wires with capacitors may be part of an inductive coupling sensor, feeding a current overload circuit monitor.
Depending on the material used as sheathing, such as heat-shrink tubing, doesn't take much heat or time to get the intended result. Seldom does any damage to sensitive components.
Soldered connections typically get soft around 180°C, close to the melt temperature of common solder types. Some are higher or lower.
Capacitors generally don't produce heat, unless in a highly reactive circuit such as phase inversion. But if the electrolyte in a capacitor is tainted, the resistive effect can cause heat issues.
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Re: How essential are the capacitors in power supply cables

Postby LakaWaka » Tue Oct 18, 2016 6:31 pm

Karlsweldt wrote:Solid sheathing around wires is not a good idea, unless intended to insulate the wires from excess heat. But that can also work in reverse, softening the insulation of the wires. Best for general use is open-weave sheathing.
The extra wires with capacitors may be part of an inductive coupling sensor, feeding a current overload circuit monitor.
Depending on the material used as sheathing, such as heat-shrink tubing, doesn't take much heat or time to get the intended result. Seldom does any damage to sensitive components.
Soldered connections typically get soft around 180°C, close to the melt temperature of common solder types. Some are higher or lower.
Capacitors generally don't produce heat, unless in a highly reactive circuit such as phase inversion. But if the electrolyte in a capacitor is tainted, the resistive effect can cause heat issues.


Thanks for the information. Essentially, from what I gather there are 2 types used. PET Plastic, and Paracord Nylon, which is a fabric like shoe lace. I would assume the plastic would be more covered, than the nylon paracord, so I would assume that the paracord would be better. Why is solid sheathing not a good idea?
Do you think removing the capacitors would be a bad thing then if it's for overload/overload monitoring?
Lately there is a method called "heatshink-less" where you essentially heat up the paracord/plastic sleeving and that melts onto the wire which causes everything to stay. The Plastic requires melting some heatshink with the plastic, then cutting off the heatshrink, while the paracord method can just be heated and it will make a seal (not sure why the plastic one needs special prep).
How hot does a soldering gun/solder usually get? 180C is not hota t all, I would think a soldering tip would be at least 600-800+ degrees?
So would it be bad if you got the capacitor hot? Essentially I was looking to do the heatshrinkless method while heating up the area around the capacitor leads where it was soldered, but wasn't sure that would be a smart idea and that I could do something very stupid like catch the capacitor on fire or something. I might be able to solve this issue another way, but for now it seems like heat will have to be produced around the area to melt the cord. I do see people use heat guns on the heatshrink near the capacitor, but the flame from a lighter is probably a lot hotter, and much closer than the heat gun... But I don't know...
Not sure I should step out into this territory and just do some heat shrink, but even then I'm not too sure how safe it is to use a heat gun near the cap either...
Thoughts? Thanks a lot.
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Re: How essential are the capacitors in power supply cables

Postby Karlsweldt » Wed Oct 19, 2016 6:15 am

Definitely the tip of a soldering gun or iron can exceed 800°F. But the higher heat is needed for rapid transfer to the solder, to melt it quickly without causing excess heat infusion to nearby components and damage them. A flame used to shrink tubing can cause a chance of a small fire, where a hot-air gun can treat a larger area quicker. Some people use the tip of a soldering iron on the tubing, but that can leave imperfections.
Depends on the application and protection required, as to how and what type shrink tubing or sheath is used.
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Re: How essential are the capacitors in power supply cables

Postby LakaWaka » Wed Oct 19, 2016 12:16 pm

Karlsweldt wrote:Definitely the tip of a soldering gun or iron can exceed 800°F. But the higher heat is needed for rapid transfer to the solder, to melt it quickly without causing excess heat infusion to nearby components and damage them. A flame used to shrink tubing can cause a chance of a small fire, where a hot-air gun can treat a larger area quicker. Some people use the tip of a soldering iron on the tubing, but that can leave imperfections.
Depends on the application and protection required, as to how and what type shrink tubing or sheath is used.


So this sounds like a bad idea from what you're saying. As I mentioned I m going to just use Paracord (Nylon, apparently what shoe laces are made of) and wanted to just melt the paracord a little to produce a melted area that wouldn't be that visible, and hold everything together. I was thinking I could cover the capacitor with some sleeving also, but would have to cut the sleeving and sew it to fit over the cap, and also make sure that nothing bad happens when heating around it (which seems like a flame would be bad, and a concentrated tip, such as a soldering iron, would be a lot better to use than a ligher.
Here is a link I wanted to show the first few posts but forgot to ask if hotlinking is okay, but I'm going to post it anyways and you can delete it (or I can edit it out) if there is an issue http://www.overclock.net/t/1494167/tuto ... lth-lacing
The user here uses super glue, before using heat shrink, whihc I'm not sure how safe it is to heat super glue, and that it wouldn't come undone by heating. I do see a lot of people use heat guns to remove mobo parts that could have adhesive on them, but not sure how safe that really is, but it's done on youtube videos all of the time.
It would be nice to not do heat shrink on these, but the issue is that cap... Is it possible to create longer leads for the capacitor, and then solder those so we could have the capacitor farther away from the flame? I'm curious if there is a distance issue with a capacitor? I know some also have said they moved the capacitor farther down the line so that it's not as visible in the sleeving..
At first, when I read this, I thought that only a few PSUs had them, but it seems mine is also an issue. I've heard this is like this, to keep costs down, but that sucks... I would like to keep them on, but not 100% sure if they are needed, and from what I gather it's a toss up. I Don't know if the overload caps are that important compared to what's going on in the PSU itself, so it's hard to say. I definitely do not want to remove any projection elements from my psu though.
Thanks a lot for the help.
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Re: How essential are the capacitors in power supply cables

Postby evasive » Sat Jan 28, 2017 3:04 pm

Interesting that your cables have integrated capcitors somewhere. What brand/model is your power supply?
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