Doc Overclock :: Motherboards.org

Doc OverclockDo you remember the kid on your block with the Erector set? You know the kid who took everything apart and then tried to put it back together again, well that kid on my block was me to the chagrin of my parents. I have always liked to tinker with things and as far back as I can recall I have been a curious George when it comes to technology. From stereos to televisions if it was in the electronics department I wanted to know more about it and have spent years pursuing that dream.

As an avid gamer, the computer offered me another avenue to play games. At thirteen my cousin brought home a Commodore 64 that grabbed my attention for the first time. This was a cassette tape machine that looked like a big bulk of plastic but had graphics that were weak at best but it did have games. When the Atari machines hit the market I was hooked even more, wow the Atari had color graphics and a cool interface that was user friendly and yes more games.

I have always been into one type of game or another, even as a kid I lived at the local Laundromat that had an old Bally's pinball machine in it. From the first pulling of the plunger I was hooked and a game addict was born. As my friends were learning Basic, Cobalt and some of the other earlier languages I was refining my skills at D and D and learning to fix VCR's. At that time in the mid eighties arcades were in full swing and my older brother had a job at the one in my town so you could only imagine where I could always be found.

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It seemed to me as a gaming outlet the computer had reached the end of its rope and I turned away from them in search of the awesome Nintendo or Sega console to further advance my gaming habit. After a stint in the US Army I found myself again in front of a computer this time with Dig Dug was my lure and I discovered to my amazement that you could upgrade. Yes that magic word upgrade created the addiction of tinkering with computers and soon I had sound and even 512k of video memory to enhance my system. But I never took any of it seriously it was all for kicks and fun. But when I went to college once again computers would come into play and become my major after a metamorphosis that started out with a music career in mind. But reality set in and I realized that technology would be the future and changed majors in mid stride adding another six months to my school charter.

Doc Overclock's LogoWhat really got me into computers seriously was the terrible design of my first actually personally bought computer, a NEC proprietary nightmare from the south side of bad systems. After weeks and weeks of pathetic customer service not to mention cash I lost it mentally and decided not this kid, not anymore. I sold my business in Eugene; Oregon packed it up and moved to California the Silicon paradise. I was soon working as a technician at EZ computers building systems for their chain of thirteen stores in Southern California. I was tinkering with the clock speeds on my Pentium 233MMX when I discovered it could be overclocked as a 266MHz CPU. The hot rod was reborn in white metal box called a PC and my friends jokingly called me Doc Overclock as I tinkered to my hearts content. I only dreamed that one day I could write like the people I admired and never thought it would or could become a reality.

Since then I have worked at various positions in both the networking and system design field and overclocked and designed hundreds of systems some even making top grades in Maximum PC magazine. While working at Aberdeen the business of motherboards.org was born and being dissatisfied with the writing on the site, I asked for a shot as a writer. At first, this idea was more of a wild card because my skills laid in computer hardware/software and not journalism so my bosses were uncertain of my writing abilities, but nonetheless told me to put up or shut up. Well after a few years and after over two hundred reviews for www.motherboards.org and other various publications, I have improved my capabilities as a writer and helped, establish motherboards.org as one of the premiere sites on the web for reviews and technical instructions. I have written for PC magazine in Turkey, been the Hardware Editor as well as writing in my own Docís Corner for PC Enthusiasts magazine. The truth about it is it has been a lot of fun on the way. I have started my own site dedicated to gaming called www.gamepyre.com, if you want to read someof the latest game reviews. I continue to pursue motherboard and video technology here at the Motherboard Homeworld and if you stick around, I may just see you in the reviews or forums.

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